Chilli Tamarind Rabbit

I love rabbit but I know that a lot of people just see them as pets and think it’s cruel to eat them. Funny how they don’t bat an eyelid when they are happily munching on other animals that are not traditionally kept as pets but hey-ho, each to their own.

This recipe is mainly based on Thai cuisine with influence from other Southeast Asian countries such as Indonesia but it was entirely created in my Frightful kitchen. Rabbit is not eaten in Thailand, except for perhaps in high-end westernised restaurants, but the flavours in this dish really go well with the gamey taste of rabbit.

If you have any qualms about rabbit you can easily use chicken or any other meat instead.

Ingredients

1 whole rabbit (approx. 1kg), cut into pieces

5cm fresh ginger

3 cloves garlic

1/2 lemongrass stalk

3 Thai chillies

1 Tbsp. Shrimp Paste (I used Indonesian Belachan but any type will do)

Approx. 80g seedless tamarind block (can use 5-6 Tbsp of store-bought tamarind concentrate)

White pepper, to taste

2 Tbsp. honey

1 Tbsp. black soy sauce (see ew dum ซีอิ๊วดำ) or Kecap Manis

1 1/2 Tbsp. fish sauce

5 kaffir lime leaves, bruised and torn

1 Spring onion, sliced

Method

1 Make a ginger, garlic, lemongrass and chilli paste in a mortar and pestle and then add shrimp paste. Combine well and reserve for later. chillitamarindrabbit12 Soak tamarind block in enough hot water to slightly cover and soak for 15 minutes. Using your hands squeeze the pulp and then use a sieve to make 5-6 Tbsp of tamarind. N.B. Store-bought tamarind concentrate works perfectly fine too just make sure it is from Thailand as Indian Tamarind for example is completely different. P.S. Excuse the photos of the tamarind; yes, I know exactly what it looks like… chillitamarindrabbit23 Marinade rabbit in 5-6 Tbsp of tamarind, white pepper, honey, black soy sauce and fish sauce. Leave to marinade for 30 minutes or preferably overnight. chillitamarindrabbit34 Fry the paste in some vegetable oil for 1-2 minutes until fragrant and then add the rabbit and mix well with the paste. Fry the rabbit for a few minutes until the flesh is no longer translucent and then add cold water until it is just covering the rabbit. Bring to a boil, add kaffir lime leaves and then braise on low for 30 – 40 minutes. chillitamarindrabbit45 Add spring onion and serve with Thai jasmine rice. chillitamarindrabbit8

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Bubur Lambuk (Malaysian Chicken Rice Porridge)

During the holy Islamic month of Ramadan most Malaysian mosques prepare massive vats of Bubur Lambuk and dish it out for free to the faithful in order to break their fast after the Asr prayers (Afternoon Prayers).

Bubur Lambuk may be mainly associated with Malaysian Ramadan but it’s so scrumptious that you should be able to enjoy it during any month of the year; it’s a bit like having pancakes throughout the year instead of just eating them on Shrove Tuesday; too good to just limit yourself to once a year.

Rice porridge is common throughout Asia; in China it is known as congee, in Thailand it is chok, in Japan it is Kayu and in India it is known as Kanji. The base of these rice porridges are similar but the spices and cooking methods vary across the continent. In Malaysia it is a thick porridge made with many spices and aromatics such as pandan leaf, lemongrass, cinnamon, fennel, cardamon and it is always garnished with Bawang Goreng (Crispy Shallots) which gives it a nice crunch against the velvety rice. Traditionally it is made with beef but the today’s version with chicken is becoming quite popular.

Ingredients:

For Bawang Goreng:

4 shallots, finely sliced

2 pinches coarse sea salt

Plenty vegetable oil

For Bubur Lambuk:

1 large chicken breast, diced into small pieces

200g jasmine rice, washed

1 litre chicken stock (or plain water)

1 Tbsp ghee (optional)

2 Tbsp shallot oil (from making Bawang Goreng)

4 shallots, diced

3 garlic cloves, finely diced

5cm fresh ginger, finely diced

1 lemongrass stalk, bashed and cut into three pieces

4 pandan leaves, tied into a knot and the ends cut off

2 star anise, whole

1 cinnamon stick, whole

1 tsp. clove (whole or ground)

1 Tbsp. fennel powder

1 tsp. fenugreek

4 cardamoms (whole or ground)

1 tsp. black pepper

Salt, to taste

200ml coconut milk

Garnish: 

Parsley, finely chopped

Bawang Goreng

Red chilli powder (optional)

Method:

First we need to make Bawang Goreng:

1 Place finely sliced shallots on a plate with kitchen paper and sprinkle with salt in order to make them sweat. Leave for around 30 minutes while you prep the Bubur Lambuk ingredients and then dab with more kitchen paper to remove excess moisture. bawang-prep2 Fry shallots in enough vegetable oil to completely cover the shallots. Start frying them from cold oil and cook on a low flame. Stir shallots continuously as to prevent them from burning and fry them until they have turned brown; it’s a fine line between brown and burnt so make sure you remove them just before you think they might need just a bit more colour. Strain shallots and leave on kitchen paper to soak up the excess oil. Leave to cool until garnishing time. Do not throw the oil from cooking the shallots as it will be full of flavour and be used in the Bubur Lambuk. bawang-gorengFor the Bubur Lambuk:

Fry shallots in a combination of ghee and shallot oil until slightly translucent. bubur-1

2 Add garlic, ginger and lemongrass and after a few minutes add pandan, star anise, cinnamon, cloves, fennel, fenugreek, cardamom, black pepper and fry until fragrant.

3 Add chicken to seal the meat and then add rice; combine well and then add chicken stock (or water). Bring to a boil and then simmer on a low flame for 10 minutes or until the rice has broken down and has become mushy. Season to taste.

bubur24 Add coconut milk and stir in well and then remove from the heat. At this point you can play with your desired consistency; if you like it less mushy add more water or coconut milk. dsc01391_fotor5 Finally, garnish with parsley, Bawang Goreng and red chilli powder if you wish.dsc01411